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Ginger

Botanically it is called as Zingiber officinale, of the family Zingiberaceae. It is a perennial plant widely cultivated in Asia for its aromatic, pungent rhizome (underground stem) used as a spice, flavouring food and medicine. Its use in India and China has been known from ancient times and by the first century A.D. traders had taken ginger to the Mediterranean region. By the 11th century, it was well-known in England. The Spaniards brought it to the West Indies and Mexico soon after their conquest and by 1547 ginger was being exported from Santiago to Spain.

The spice has a pleasant, slightly biting taste and is usually dried and ground to flavour breads, sauces, curry dishes, confections, pickles and ginger ale. The fresh rhizome is used in cooking. The peeled rhizomes may be preserved by boiling in syrup. Medically it is used in fever, cough and cold, influenza, flatulence and colic.

Ginger contains 2% of essential oil, the principle of the spice is zingerone. The oil is distilled from the rhizomes for use in the food and perfume industry. In ancient times, raw ginger was used as a breath sweetener, an aid to digestion, a cure for toothache and bleeding gumsand as a strengthening agent for loose teeth and weak eyes.

Benefit and uses of Ginger.

  • It is used as a remedy to treat many conditions, including nausea, indigestion, fever, and infection.
  • Uses of ginger include treatment of ailments involving the large intestine and colon, nausea, indigestion, paralysis of the tongue, morning sickness, vomiting, hot flashes, menstrual cramps and gas.
  • Ginger is said to stimulate gastric juices, and provide warming and soothing effects for colds and coughs.
  • Ginger may reduce blood levels of sugar and cholesterol, while also lowering blood pressure.
  • Ginger mixed with honey taken three times a day is a good remedy for cough.
  • Doctors used ginger to control nausea, vomiting and stomach pain.
  • Dried ginger improves poor memory. For this purpose, 1 gram of powder in warm milk is an excellent way of using ginger.
  • Fresh ginger has also been used for cold-induced disease, asthma, cough, colic, heart palpitation, swellings, dyspepsia, loss of appetite, and rheumatism. It has been investigated as well for potential properties including antibacterial, anticonvulsant, analgesic, antiulcer, gastric antisecretory, antitumor, antifungal, antispasmodic, antiallergenic, and more.


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