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Erythroderma - Causes, Symptoms and Treatment to Get Rid of Erythroderma fast.


Definition

Erythroderma is also known as erythrodermatitis, generalized exfoliative dermatitis, and red man syndrome. It is defined as a generalized skin disorder characterized by reddening and scaling of 100% of the skin. It is a rare skin disorder that usually first appears during the end of the first month of life or the beginning of the second month. The erythema tends to decrease in later life and may disappear in middle age, but the scaling persists and may even worsen with age. Small stature, mental retardation, ocular defects and other developmental abnormalities are occasionally associated. Long-standing erythroderma is often associated with hair loss, ectropion of the eyelids and even nail shedding.

Erythroderma is a rare skin disorder, and studies on its incidence and causes are lacking. The annual incidence has been estimated to be 1 to 2 patients per 100,000 inhabitants.

Causes

  1. It may be an extension of a pre-existing skin disorder. Especially atopic dermatitis, may lead to the condition of erythroderma.
  2. The various skin disorders like eczema, Hodgkin’s disease, leukemia etc. may also lead to erythroderma.
  3. A low calcium diet may also induce erythroderma.
  4. This can also be caused by the side effect of some medicines like Cromolyn, Clofazimine, and Fenoprofen etc. Almost 60 medicines are found to be creating this disease.
  5. Internal malignancies e.g. carcinoma of rectum, lung, fallopian tubes, colon.

Symptoms

  1. The most common symptom is red skin patches on the body.
  2. The other symptom is thickening of the skin.
  3. There may be skin peeling.
  4. Skin flaking may also occur.
  5. Serous ooze, resulting in clothes and dressings sticking to the skin and an unpleasant smell.
  6. Secondary infection may occur with pustules and crusting.
  7. Increased heart rate that may result in heart failure in untreated or severe cases particularly in the elderly.
  8. Dehydration is a common symptom of erythroderma.
  9. In erythroderma there may be fluid filled blisters on the body which after scratching can be got infected and give rise to a foul skin odour.
  10. Nails become ridged and thickened or may shed.

Treatment

  1. Systemic steroids may be helpful in some cases but should be avoided in suspected cases of psoriasis and staphylococcal-scalded skin syndrome.
  2. Dithranol is very effective in most of the cases. It can be applied to the skin for 24 hours and should be used in combination with UVB.
  3. Institute systemic antibiotics if signs of secondary infection are observed. Antihistamines help reduce pruritus and provide needed sedation.
  4. Apply wet dressing and change it every two or three hours. Apply intermediate-strength topical steroids beneath wet dressing. Suggest a tepid bath once or more daily between dressing changes. Reduce frequency of dressings and gradually introduce emollients between dressing applications as Erythroderma improves.
  5. Emollients and topical steroids may also be used.
  6. Preexisting malnutrition may become more marked and require nutritional intervention in older patients.
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