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First Aid

Absorbed Poisons
Asthma Attack
Bites And Stings From Marine Creatures
Bites and Stings
Burns and Scalds
Corrosive, Petrol-Based Substances
Cuts, Scratches, Abrasions and Wounds
Diabetic Emergencies
Drug Overdose
Ear Problems
Electric Shock
Extreme Overexposure
Eye Injuries
Fish Hook Injury
Fractured Ribs
Head and Facial Injuries
Heart Attack
Heart Failure
Heat Exhaustion
Inhaled Poisons
Insect Bites And Stings
Medicinal or General Substances
Open (Sucking) Chest Wounds
Overexposure to Cold
Road Accidents
Sea Snakes
Spider Bites
Spinal Injuries
Sprains and Dislocations
Swallowed Objects
Tick Paralysis
Tooth Injuries

First Aid Guide

First aid is the immediate and temporary proper aid provided to a sick or injured person or animal until medical treatment can be provided. It generally consists of series of simple, life-saving medical techniques that a non-doctor or lay person can be trained to perform with minimal equipment.

You should keep one first-aid kit in your home and one in each car. Also be sure to bring a first-aid kit on family vacations.

Things you should have in our first aid box

  • Sterile gauze
  • Adhesive tape
  • Adhesive bandages in several sizes
  • Two pairs of Latex, or other sterile gloves (if you are allergic to Latex).
  • Eye wash solution to flush the eyes or as general decontaminant.
  • Tweezers
  • Sharp scissors
  • Safety pins
  • Disposable instant cold packs
  • Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant
  • Thermometer
  • Aloe vera gel
  • Aspirin or nonaspirin pain reliever
  • Soap
  • Antiseptic solution
  • Flashlight
  • Extra prescription medications (if the family is going on vacation)


First aid can be performed without a first aid kit. Any cloth (preferably as clean as possible) can be used as a bandage. Duct tape could also be used to secure a dressing. Common household items such as a magazine or even sticks can be used for splints. Direct pressure to stop bleeding can be applied with a hand if nothing else presents itself. Obviously it is better to have proper equipment, but improvised equipment has saved many lives.

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Disclaimer: is an information and educational purposes web site only. It is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. Do not rely upon any of the information provided on this site for medical diagnosis or treatment. Please consult your primary health care provider about any personal health concerns. We will not be liable for any complications, or other medical accidents arising from the use of any information on this site.